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was read his miranda rights. the special agent who filed the complaint would that according to surveillance footage. younger suspect lifted the phone to his ear shortly about before the second blast. after he finishes you see people around him react to the first explosion. bomber two virtually alone in front of the individuals in front of the restaurant while he appears calm. he walks away without his knapsack, having left it on the ground where he had been standing. approximately ten seconds later an explosion occurs in that location where bomber two had placed his knapsack. and another major development, the white house said it would not designate the suspect an enemy combatant. we will have more on the legal aspect of this coming up later this hour. as of this hour dzhokhar is in serious condition. he is unable to speak because of a gunshot to the throat which we believe was self-inflicted. he's communicating by writing and nodding his head. as authorities move forward in a of in their investigation, tritening information about the radical past of the brothers is in fact emerging. both t
't -- he shouldn't be mirandaized right away. i know you agree with them. >> i think the miranda issue is an easier issue. he doesn't have to be mar lindaized for a lot of reason. first of all, they have enough evidence to convict him without getting a confession from him. all miranda gets you is a confession you can use in court. you can use that information for everything else. remember, he confessed already to the guy they kidnapped. the guy he kidnapped says, these two guys told us, we did the bombing. they got great witness and they got a great confession. maybe even better than a law enforcement confession where you can claim it was forced out of you. they gave a upon takenious confession -- spontaneous confession. >> bob wants to get in here. so then why did they need to make that statement? i'm trying to figure out why they made that statement? >> i don't know exactly why they made it. maybe because they got so much criticism -- remember the christmas morning bomber that they mirandaized right away, lost the opportunity to get information from him? so i think maybe they were pl
him before he receives miranda warning is the right thing to do. a short time ago, the aclu put out a statement saying every defendant is entitled to defend miranda lights. five lawmakers want him treated as an enemy combatant. 53 people remain in boston hospitals today, three in critical condition, including a 7-year-old girl. nbc news national investigative correspondent michaels i cough is in boston, ron allen outside boston's beth israel medical center where the suspect and many of the victims are being kept and kristen we willinger at the white house, let's get to the latest on investigation. for that, we turn to michaels i cough, again, in boston. what is the fbi focusing on today and moving forward? >> reporter: federal prosecutors are focusing on drafting a criminal complaint we could see as early as this afternoon, detailing the criminal charges against him supported by an affidavit from an fbi agent that would lay out some details of the plot. not all of them but could provide crucial new information for us about what tsarnaev actually did and raise and shed some light on
be read his miranda rights. moving past the politics of it because it seems to get a little poe lit kal, as a former member of fbi how does whether or not the suspect is read his miranda rights influence or impact your investigation? >> it really becomes irrelevant. good report-based interviewers and interrogators who are the ones most effective. the fbi doesn't do that because we're nice. we do that because it worked. in reported based interviewers miranda they can read that and continue. it is not a major obstacle. it is almost irrelevant. jenna: really? we're hearing a it is a major issue whether we get to the bottom of this investigation. so what should we consider as we continue to hear the debate ongoing over the next several days? >> it doesn't, it really doesn't make that much difference to the interviewers and especially the particular group of profile he is -- profilers they developed at quantico, at the fbi academy. this is not terribly relevant. they can sit down with the people. they can interview them. they look for behavioral cues. they look for a way to establish a relat
's miranda rights. they said he could still pose a threat either because there are more bombs planted out there or he's connected to a larger terrorist cell. either way it has some lawmakers concerned. as investigators continue to interrogate their suspect some lawmakers argue he should be treated as an enemy combatant and denied an attorney for the time being. >> we should be allowed her intelligence-gathering purposes. >> investigators say they're still uncertain whether zocor and his brother tamerlan who died in a shoot-out on friday with police have any ties to fore te union issued a statement saying we must not waver from our tried and true justice system even in the most difficult of times. denial of rights is un-american and will only make it harder to obtain fair convictions. some liberal lawmakers agree and said they would be comfortable with tsarnaev being designated as an enemy combatant. >> i don't believe. it would beunconstitutional to >> it carries its own risk especially if that suspect is an american citizen. it could be challenged in court and that
federal government has done the right thing. when ints that somehow suspects have right to counsel miranda warnings causes them to stop cooperating with law enforcement is not facts and studies. and ct, d.o.j. officials senior law enforcement officials 90% of the ou 80% to time in sophisticated cases when defense counsel get involved to help emhis more and icit more information allow the case to go forward. there have been multiple cases 9/11 that have been prosecuted, investigated and prosecuted by law enforcement resulted in more information available to law lawful tools ing without needing to violate rights. senator mentioned graham. he pushed against the decision the combatant status. [video clip] >> i hope the congress will at this case and look at our laws and come to the to.lusion that i have come we are at war. for a going to be at war very long time and we have to have the tools to defend values.es within our one of those tools is the ability to question people about future attacks to gather intelligence for national purposes without benefit of counsel. the information will neve
in the decision. but they detoured not too far over. >> the decision not to read him his miranda rights even though at one point you see him getting out of the boat, in that picture he is conscience. how did that decision come about? >> this is a federal case involving a terrorism situation and i was not aware that in the federal system there can be a removal or a discontinuation of miranda rights in emergency situations. so that's exactly what happened. the united states attorney's office advised us not to administer miranda rights. we gave that information out to our officers and i think all law enforcement was operating under those rules of engagement. >> back to the apartment real quickly. there were devices found in the apartment but you can't comment on what? >> no, i didn't say that. i can't comment on any evidence that was found there. sglp anything that was found in the apartment. are you confident that these two were acting alone and that there are no more suspects out there? >> i'm confident that they were the two major actors in the violence that occurred. i am very, very sure th
okayed the suspension of the suspect's miranda rights. is that a temporary suspension? >> reporter: yes, by law it is. it's called the public safety exception to the miranda rule. normally you have to tell someone they have a right to remain silent and if you don't, then you can't use anything they tell you in court. so that's why the miranda warning is given. but there is an exception. you don't have to do it if there's a possible threat to public safety. and here obviously there's a concern about whether there are potential accomplices. investigators say they haven't found any. or other explosives. they say they haven't found any of those either but that's what they want to ask him. and this exception probably begins to expire the moment you invoke it so it's probably no good for more than a day or two but nonetheless they can do that. afterwards they'll have to give him his miranda warning and say whether he'll continue to answer questions. the justice department says even in very serious cases like this, most people in custody do continue to talk. >> pete, who's going to be interrog
is a key word here. the administration has ruled out using that term. i am informed, joe, that miranda was -- the suspect was mirandized today. i don't know exactly what that means. it doesn't sound like they will have enough elbow room to ask questions. what is your take? >> what happens was there was resentment in the hospital today where a u.s. magistrate average, prosecutor and a public defender were in attendance, in explaining the charges to the defendant, he was told he had the right to remain silent, that an attorney would be provided for him and he was asked if he understood those things. he did. he was told he did not have to make any statements. so the so-called period in which they were going to glean all of this intelligence from him has ended. if he chooses to speak, it will, no doubt, be over the objection of his public defender and now that he's lawyered up, my guess is that the talking is over. >> was this a mistake in i mean, a lot of people calling for enemy combatant status. that would have given a lot more time for questioning. he can be brought back into the feder
asked if he understood what was happening. his miranda rights were read to him. they decided to read him his miranda rights. those were given to him today as well. the security here is very tight. in fact, what is interesting is, he potentially might get out of the hospital later than many of his victims that are also here recovering. greta? >> adam, in terms what have went down before he was mirandized, was he interviewed by the fbi or anybody in the last couple of days since he was taken into custody? did he give him information that they considered valuable and helpful? >> reporter: we learned a cowl of things. 1; yes, there were questions asked of him. the first few hours if not more than that, they were worried about making sure should thguy survives. he got here on friday night in pretty bad condition. he bled from injuries nearly 20 hours. he was obviously in rough condition. so the number-1 priority was to make sure he survived to get information from him. questions were asked of him before he was mirandized. they haven't said of course, they are not going to give away what he sa
. and his miranda rights were read to him. there was reporting if they weren't going to, but they decided to read him his miranda rights and those were given to him today as well. the security here is still very tight. what is interesting is he potentially might get out of the hospital later than many of his victims that are here also recovering. greta. >> adam, in terms of what went down before he was mirandized, was he interviewed by the fbi or by anybody in the last couple days since he was taken into custody? and it he give them information that they considered valuable and helpful? >> we learned a couple of things. yes, there were questions asked of him. the first few hours, if not more than that, obvious think they were making sure he survived so you had that situation. he got here friday night in pretty bad condition. he bled for nearly 24 hours and then the fire fight at the boat. the number one priority for them was to make sure he survived so they could get information from him. questions were asked of him before he was mirandized. they haven't said, of course, because it's part
with the questions out receiving miranda warnings but the only downside is that his statements may not be used against him at trial. this is not much of a risk when you consider the other available evidence including photo images of him at the scene of the bombings and his own reported confession to the victim whose car he helped hijack during the last week's terror in boston. . but if your concern is over the larger threat in who the tsarnaev brothers were and are, what they did and what they represent, then worry a lot. for starters, you you can worry about how the high-value intergage group or h.i.g., will do its work. that unit was finally put in place by the f.b.i. after so-called underwear bomber tried to blow up the airplane in which he was traveling as it flew over detroit on christmas day, 2009. and was advise of his mir and da rights. the c.i.a. interrogation program that might have handleled the interview had by then been dismantled by president obama. at the behest of such muslim brotherhood affiliated groups as the council on american islamic relations, and the islamic society of
with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety." the administration had rightly invoked this public safety exception in the case of the boston suspect which provided our national security professionals a discreet period of time to gather intelligence from the suspect without the presence of his lawyer. however, soon after questioning him this way, the administration recently reversed itself and read the suspect his miranda rights. in doing so, the administration, in my view, gave up a valuable opportunity to lawfully and thoroughly question the suspect for purposes of gathering intelligence about potential future terrorist plots. whether we will be able to acquire such information has now been left entirely at the discretion of the suspect and his lawyer. put simply, the suspect has been told he has the right to remain silent, and if he doesn't want to provide intelligence, he doesn't have to. is this a responsible balance between a citizen's rights and our national security? the
administration has agreed to delay a reading of his miranda rights under a public safety exemption, secretary of defense chuck hagel has not seen evidence to link the bombings to terror groups. scrutiny turns to the fbi who reportedly questioned the older brother tamerlan in 2011 at the request of a foreign government. this is so interesting. of russia. the fbi told the a.p. despite interviewing him and relatives they did not find any activity. the agency dropped the ball. richard, i wonder if there is going to be a lot of questions and maybe even hearings out of this or what comes to mind just knowing those basic facts? >> there probably will be hearings of the fbi whether it learned more or could have done more. critics say that is monday morning quarterbacking. it ought to be about what we were talking about, what can we do to prevent or identify young people who are radicalized and how did we respond and how what did we learn about lockdowns. as the military would say it ought not to just focus on fbi. it's much bigger and much broader. we have to learn a lot from this. the reason is this
news tsarnaev will not be given a miranda warning when he's physically able to be interrogated after receiving medical treatment. instead, the official says the government will invoke a legal rule known as the public safety exception. that will allow investigators to question tsarnaev without first advising him of his right to remain silent and be afforded legal counsel. president obama used his weekly address today to praise law enforcement and those involved in tracking tsarnaev down. >> americans refused to be terrorized. ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain, the stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, generosity, and love. >> authorities caught up with the suspect after a tip from a watertown resident. he was hiding in a boat parked outside a home. he is now in a boston hospital and nbc's ron allen is joining me from there. ron, with a good afternoon to you, let's get the very latest on his condition. are you getting word from the hospital or are they staying somewhat silent on that? >> reporter: absolutely silent, alex.
was provided before or after that judge/magistrate was there and r read him his miranda rights? the right to remain silent and the right to have an attorney? >> sources have indicated to us that was part of a questioning that they did under the -- fbi agent does under a national security exemption, before he was assigned counsel. they had the ability in the interest of public safety exception to be able to ask questions, were there additional coconspirators, where and were there additional explosives. the source of things you want to know immediately in order to protect the public. presumably base wanted on what we are hearing, those are the questions they asked and the kinds of responses prior to the first appearance yesterday. >> that would fit in with the public safety exception in the there a in providing the miranda rights to this criminal defendant as he now is, charges have been read to him. fran, we'll stay in close touch with you, fran townsend. much more from boston in just a moment. other news that we're watching as well. the fbi, back in washington, up on capitol hill, lawmake
bomber was mirandized within 45 minutes. i don't care if you read people miranda rights. i just don't want you to shut down the intelligence-gathering process. that individual was never designated an enassembly combatant. only way he agreed to cooperate is f.b.i. flew to his family i and his parents convinced him. times square bomber, the times square bombing incident, he had pakistan/taliban ties. read miranda rights, never designated enemy combatant. we never terroristed him for intelligence gathering purposes. osama bin laden's soim, abu gazey is in the federal system today and read miranda rights. never designated enemy combatant. can you imagine what osama bin laden's son-in-law could tell us about the terrorist organizations? he was the spokesman for al qaeda after 9/11. so there's a disturbing pattern here, quite frankly, of not gathering intelligence when that opportunity exists. thank you very much. i have to go. i will get a pen and pad and go next door to answer any questions if you have about the f.b.i. and, again, we're going to absorb a moment of silence here for the f
want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospitalized under sedation and remains unclear what kind of communication they are able to have him at the moment. judy is on the phone from north carolina, independent line. good morning, and welcome to the program. caller: thank you. my thought on the issue is that we are a large nation, an all- inclusive nation, and i believe that the boy scouts is a private organization and has the right to determine who their membership is. i believe there should be a third organization that some of the gay-rights people should put into place, and that would be the rainbow scouts. then they can put all the lbb tea in anything they wanted, -- lgbt. republi
but say they were not in contact with overseas terror groups. he was read his miranda rights during an initial court appearance from the hospital that gives the suspect access to a lawyer. and means he will not be tried as an enemy combatant. described as a possible gun shot wound to the hand, the 19-year-old has been described as cooperative during questioning, forced to write his answers or nod yes or no. he told investigators that he and his brother came up with the attacks on their own finding internet resources to learn how to make bombs. he's been assigned three public defenders and could very well face the death penalty. a weekend search of dzhokhar's dorm room turned up a black jacket and white hat, similar to the surveillance photos. investigators also want to question tsarnaev's wife. she later converted to islam, dropped out of college and had a child with him. her attorney has said she had no suspicions that her husband might be plotting an attack. meanwhile, hundreds of people stood in silence at 2:50 p.m. one week after the bombings. president obama marked the moment o
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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